Author of Native American Antiquity and The Cherokee Chronicles


  • Aztec Rooms, New Mexico
  • Anasazi Petroglyphs
  • Chaco Canyon Pueblo bonito Don on tour
  • Coutney Miller, Author, with telescope
  • Chaco Canyon with Fajada Butte in background
  • 1987-Chaco-Canyon-Pueblo-del-Arroyo
  • Courtney's new book, The Raven Mocker
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  • Swinging it in Boulder, CO
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Inspired by the art, archaeology, archaeoastronomy, History, and Culture of Native America

Courtney Miller’s first book, “The First Raven Mocker”, which is Book 1 of the 7-book series, “The Cherokee Chronicles”, has received awards from the 2014 Beverly Hills Book Awards,  The International Book Awards, and the National INDIE Excellence Book Awards for Historical Fiction.  Book 3, coming out in 2016, has already received an award from the 2015 Draft to Dream competition.

Award Winning Author


5 minute video of Courtney Miller at Meet the Authors, Salida, Colorado, March 29, 2014


Author has the write idea:

Courtney in planter box with father planting cotton

I was born on a small rural farm in the Panhandle of Texas where my only friends were imaginary.  While my father harvested cotton, I cultivated my imagination.”

“When I was very young, perhaps four or five, I hopped on the couch next to Mother and asked that question all parents dread, “Mommy, where did I come from?”  Ever calm in a crisis, she explained that I am Scotch-Irish, English, and Cherokee.”



EARLDELAOnce, at my grandmother’s house, I overheard my uncles discussing our Cherokee heritage.  Grandmother never discussed it and they were debating why.  One offered that maybe she was ashamed of being a “half-breed”.  Another speculated that maybe the family had always been afraid of being rounded up and relocated to Oklahoma.  It was the first time that I realized that there is a stigma associated with being Native American.”

“In high school I was fortunate to study under a very highly rated and extraordinary English teacher who liked my little stories and encouraged me to become a writer.  When I told my parents that I wanted to be a writer, my father cried and my mother laughed and explained that ‘you can’t make a living as a writer’.”

“The hard work and long hours working on a farm inspired me to look for something else to do for a career.  Becoming a writer was out, so I went to college to search for an alternative career.  After attending three major universities and four colleges, I finally got a degree in mid-management and spent forty years making a decent living in the business world.  When I retired from business, I turned to writing and based upon my experience so far, Mother was right, you can’t make a living at it.”

 “When I was around forty, a relative brought a family tree to a family reunion and stated that he was frustrated that he could not say for certain where our Cherokee roots started.  This inspired me to see what I could find.  But, after digging into my roots for years, I learned that the traits that make me a good writer make me a terrible genealogist.   A good genealogist is like a scientist demanding  irrefutable evidence to support each piece of the family story.  As a writer, I am prone to devise fanciful stories out of even the most meager fragments.”

Elsie Bass Guthrie“I have not been able to prove my Cherokee roots but have discovered that what I thought I knew is based on Hollywood’s fixation on the Plains Indians.  I found that the Cherokee were vastly different than what I thought and I have been motivated to learn more ever since.”

“My high school teacher, who is my inspiration for writing, told me that I should write about what I know.  But, since my life has been so dull, I have to write about what I am passionate about—the art, archaeology, astronomy, history and culture of Native America.”

“When I sat down to write my first novel, the characters were easy.  I just used my imaginary friends from my childhood.”