Apr 062017
 

The state of affairs in 1828

Cherokee Principal Chief John Ross

By 1828, new states had been added and many had drawn their borders to overlap Indian territory.  Some of these states, especially Georgia, believed that state laws should apply to everyone living within their borders.   The state legislature of Georgia, enacted a series of laws which stripped the Cherokee of their rights under the laws of the state.  Indians believed that they should be exempt from state laws within their territorial boundaries.

The idea of removing Native Americans from east of the Mississippi was gaining favor in congress.

Mar 272017
 

There have been over 500 treaties made between the United States and Native Americans.  And there have been over 500 treaties broken.  Why?

In this article, I will concentrate on relations with those tribes east of the Mississippi—the “civilized tribes”—and five points in time that I think best illustrate how relations have gone from cooperative and respectful to intolerant and disrespectful.

Senate Resolution 76 (1987) reads:

The confederation of the original 13 colonies into one republic was influenced by the political system developed by the Iroquois Confederacy, as were many of the democratic principles which were incorporated into the constitution itself.

Oct 032016
 

OCTOBER: Harvest Moon Duninudi Time of traditional “Harvest Festival” Nowatequa when the people give thanks to all the living things of the fields and earth that helped them live, and to the “Apportioner” Unethlana. Cheno i-equa or “Great Moon” Festival is customarily held at this time.

Sep 012016
 

Fruits and nuts were gathered from the trees and bushes during this moon.  Many of them were put in breads for crunch and flavor.  Hunting was stepped up to prepare for fall and winter.  The Ripe Corn Festival was celebrated to honor Selu, First Woman, and The Apportioner, as well, for providing a fertile harvest.

Aug 012016
 

By the time of the Fruit Moon, Galoni [August], the green corn has started to ripen.  No corn is eaten until after the Green Corn Festival.  “The Green Corn Ceremony was traditionally celebrated during late June or early July for about four days. The dates scheduled for the celebration depended upon the time the first corn ripened. The ceremony was held in the middle of the ceremonial grounds. Included in the rituals were the stomp dance, feather dance and buffalo dances.

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