Jul 012016
 

The moon of the ripe corn is a time for celebrating the bountiful treasures given to us by Asgaya Galvlati, the “Apportioner”.  The “Green Corn Dance” was Cherokee ball play -- by Mailsonce celebrated at this time.  And it is traditionally the start of the stick ball games known as the Anetsa, or “Little Brother of War.”

[learn more about the Cherokee stick ball game]

 

Art logoIn the old days, the women spent many hours of the day weaving clothes and baskets, crafting pottery, and grinding corn in thex Pottery 002 plazas of their villages.  They passed the time singing songs, gossiping, laughing and sharing skills and stories.  They were happy, productive times.  Feather Smith, a guide at the Diligwa Village, Tahlequah, Oklahoma, explained the Cherokee crafts in these videos from the Native American Antiquity article “Great Sites, Part 6: The Cherokee Crafts.

Jun 012016
 

For the ancestors, Tihuluhiyi [June], the Green Corn Moon, signals the emergence of plants in the fields and the first sign of “corn in tassel”.  With the beginning of summer, it was a time to repair the Council House and build or repair new homes.  Note: The Green Corn Moon should not be confused with the Green Corn Ceremony that happens in August (Galoni: The Fruit Moon).

Art logo

Apr 012016
 

Kawoni is the “Flower Moon” for the Cherokee.   This is when plants first come out and flowers bloom. This is a time for new births and renewal.  This is when plants can be gathered to replenish our medicines and herbs.   The “Long Man”, the streams and rivers, swell and bring renewal and cleansing.  This is a time we go to water and pay tribute to the Great Apportioner.

 

Culture LogoThe Origin of Disease and Medicine

Feb 012016
 

FEBRUARY: Bony Moon Kagali Traditional time of personal-family feast for the ones who had departed this world. A family meal is prepared with place(s) set for the departed. This is also a time of fasting and ritual observance. A community dance officiated by a “doctor” Didanawiskawi commonly referred to as a Medicine-person. Connected to this moon is the “Medicine Dance”.

Jan 012016
 

Teaching son 002Note to readers of Native American Antiquity:  This article marks a change.  This year, the journal will change from weekly to monthly and will  present facts on the art, archaeology, astronomy, history and culture in each article.  I hope you enjoy the new format, wado (thanks), Courtney Miller.

Culture LogoFor the ancient Cherokee, this time of the year was a time for personal reflection and purification through ritual and ceremony.  It was a time of preparation for spring, repairing old tools and making new ones.  It was a time when families moved into their “asi” or winter house and listened to stories told by the elders.  The asi’s were conical clay houses partially submerged where the families could sit and sleep around the center fire to stay warm.

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