Jul 012016
 

The moon of the ripe corn is a time for celebrating the bountiful treasures given to us by Asgaya Galvlati, the “Apportioner”.  The “Green Corn Dance” was Cherokee ball play -- by Mailsonce celebrated at this time.  And it is traditionally the start of the stick ball games known as the Anetsa, or “Little Brother of War.”

[learn more about the Cherokee stick ball game]

 

Art logoIn the old days, the women spent many hours of the day weaving clothes and baskets, crafting pottery, and grinding corn in thex Pottery 002 plazas of their villages.  They passed the time singing songs, gossiping, laughing and sharing skills and stories.  They were happy, productive times.  Feather Smith, a guide at the Diligwa Village, Tahlequah, Oklahoma, explained the Cherokee crafts in these videos from the Native American Antiquity article “Great Sites, Part 6: The Cherokee Crafts.

Jan 012016
 

Teaching son 002Note to readers of Native American Antiquity:  This article marks a change.  This year, the journal will change from weekly to monthly and will  present facts on the art, archaeology, astronomy, history and culture in each article.  I hope you enjoy the new format, wado (thanks), Courtney Miller.

Culture LogoFor the ancient Cherokee, this time of the year was a time for personal reflection and purification through ritual and ceremony.  It was a time of preparation for spring, repairing old tools and making new ones.  It was a time when families moved into their “asi” or winter house and listened to stories told by the elders.  The asi’s were conical clay houses partially submerged where the families could sit and sleep around the center fire to stay warm.

Oct 302014
 

BasketsThis week’s article is on Cherokee crafts from the 18th century explained and demonstrated at Diligwa Village at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.  This reconstruction of an authentic Cherokee village from 1710 is a great site to visit to get a feel for how the Cherokee lived back then.  Many thanks to Feather Smith and Betty for their contributions.Textiles

Oct 232014
 

  This week we are going to explore the weapons and games used by the Cherokee in the 16th century based on the guide and demonstrators of Diligwa Village at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

Oct 162014
 

 

Don before Diligwa 002Osiyo.  In this segment, we are going to learn about Cherokee housing, circa 1710, at Diligwa Village at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.  The village features representative housing, public buildings, ball and game fields, and crafts and weapon demonstrations.  When we visited, our guide was Feather Smith [watch a short video with Feather Smith explaining the housing].

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