Jun 012016
 

For the ancestors, Tihuluhiyi [June], the Green Corn Moon, signals the emergence of plants in the fields and the first sign of “corn in tassel”.  With the beginning of summer, it was a time to repair the Council House and build or repair new homes.  Note: The Green Corn Moon should not be confused with the Green Corn Ceremony that happens in August (Galoni: The Fruit Moon).

Art logo

Apr 012016
 

Kawoni is the “Flower Moon” for the Cherokee.   This is when plants first come out and flowers bloom. This is a time for new births and renewal.  This is when plants can be gathered to replenish our medicines and herbs.   The “Long Man”, the streams and rivers, swell and bring renewal and cleansing.  This is a time we go to water and pay tribute to the Great Apportioner.

 

Culture LogoThe Origin of Disease and Medicine

Mar 012016
 

March, the Windy Moon, Anvyi.  The “First New Moon” after the equinox is the traditional start of the new cycle for planting.  New town council fires are made. and all the fires of the villages are extinguished and relit from the sacred council fire.

Art logoA Cherokee Feast of Days, Joyce Sequichie Hifler, March 14

Feb 012016
 

FEBRUARY: Bony Moon Kagali Traditional time of personal-family feast for the ones who had departed this world. A family meal is prepared with place(s) set for the departed. This is also a time of fasting and ritual observance. A community dance officiated by a “doctor” Didanawiskawi commonly referred to as a Medicine-person. Connected to this moon is the “Medicine Dance”.

Jan 012016
 

Teaching son 002Note to readers of Native American Antiquity:  This article marks a change.  This year, the journal will change from weekly to monthly and will  present facts on the art, archaeology, astronomy, history and culture in each article.  I hope you enjoy the new format, wado (thanks), Courtney Miller.

Culture LogoFor the ancient Cherokee, this time of the year was a time for personal reflection and purification through ritual and ceremony.  It was a time of preparation for spring, repairing old tools and making new ones.  It was a time when families moved into their “asi” or winter house and listened to stories told by the elders.  The asi’s were conical clay houses partially submerged where the families could sit and sleep around the center fire to stay warm.

Sign up!

Get Courtney Miller's private scrapbook FREE

Intimate notes, original drawings, and sketches, detailed scene diagrams, and floor plans created by the author provide unique insights for the reader.    

 

Includes exclusive photos and personal stories shared by the Author about his life, writing, and research.  

 

Get your free copy today!

We respect your privacy.
You might also likeclose